Potting up, eager beavers, and Delicata as a good parent?

Apologies in advance if these are dumb questions. Remember I’m the greenest of newbies.

  1. What is your preference for planting a germinated achene if you are using the paper towel method of stratification? By this I’m wondering if you pop it into some potting medium the moment you spot a root or if you wait until the root is something like a cm in length. I’m just wondering if anyone has watched to see if one yeilds better results than the other. Also, do you remove the achene before planting, if your root has already made an appearance? Is there any danger to doing this? (Aside from slipping and removing the root, that is!)

  2. Has anyone made any observations about the “eager beavers” vs those seeds which germinate after a more “normal” stratification period? By this I mean within a variety. For example, if I have a whole bunch of seeds of a particular type and 2 or 3 germinate weeks earlier than the others, is this a good indication of vigor, or are they more likely not to make it in the long run?

  3. Here’s possibly my dumbest question yet: Why is no one using the hybrid rugosa Delicata for breeding repeat blooming cold-hardy roses (that might have a good fragrance even!). I see that it is cold hardy to zone 2 and it sets hips abundantly. It’s repeat blooming and fragrant. Sounds like a great prospect. I collected some OP hips from Delicata and they seem to be germinating well at this point. But there must be some reason it’s not being used. Just curious about what that is.

Thanks for the answers!

Alicia

I have gotten very good seedlings from Delicata. An open pollinated seedling is pictured at:

http://home.neo.rr.com/kuska/delicata95.htm

See the link below for examples of crosses.

Link: home.neo.rr.com/kuska/hips-2003-season-sort-seed.htm

Henry, maybe I’m wrong and others such as yourself are using it. Help Me Find lists no descendants from Delicata, so I figured it wasn’t high on anyone’s list.

Your seedling looks, from what I can tell, just like its parent plant. Did you keep it? Has it done well for you?

Alicia, these are all very good questions. As far as potting up, I usually let the root get about 1/8th of an inch or a bit more. The main reason is sometimes a root will emerge and not grow anymore and I hate to waste the effort of potting, recording, etc. I also find that the roots of achenes that germinate early tend to be less likely to succumb to rot from mold, and if I let the root emerge a bit (on the older achenes), it will become obvious if will make it. As far as removing the outer hard shell, I don’t do it unless the seed is stuck. I’ve done it in the past, but I haven’t found any benefit to it, and in fact, from my experience, it seems to me the germinating seedling may benefit from having it intact, though I have no scientific evidence for saying that. I often will remove the inner thin coat however. Wetting it helps get it off easily.

I can’t comment on #2, but it’s clear to me that embryos with roots that emerge and grow quickly are more likely to live and produce a nice little seedling, than ones whose roots are slow growers.

In the link below, if you use the find command with the word Delicata, you can see how I have used Delicata seedlings last season.

I have kept many seedlings of Delicata - particularly white double flowered ones. A number of them (most) are among my best rebloomers. They are rather large plants- 6 or 7 foot.

Link: home.neo.rr.com/kuska/2004_and_2005_very%20good%20seedlings.htm

*What is your preference for planting a germinated achene if you are using the paper towel method of stratification? *

I usually wait until the root has lengthened a little, as when I plant the sprouted sprouted seedling I never put the seed part under the soil. Whenever I’ve tried that the seed almost invariably does not come up for me. If I can, I usually remove the achene. I’d rather leave the achene

coating than damage the seedling.

Has anyone made any observations about the “eager beavers” vs those seeds which germinate after a more “normal” stratification period>.



I can’t say that I’ve noticed any difference