Seedlings to share

I have some seedlings I would love to share if people are interested in them. I have more than I can accomodate.

Rosa beggeriana (seedlings look like selfs- I counted the female parent and it is diploid. Paul Olsen shared this clone with me) Perhaps they are crosses with the polyanthas that are abundant and nearby.

(Polyantha x Rosa maximowicziana) op These seedlings are one time bloomers, but many likely carry a copy of the repeat bloom allele. The parents are diploid. The Rosa max. clone is very very hardy and the parent plants (more than one sibling planted next to each other and seed was bulked) are also pretty cane hardy in MN (zone 4). Some seedlings segregated for thornlessness from the original thornless polyantha parent. THose are likely crosses among siblings or maybe a thornless poly nearby. If I have enough I’ll send more than one so you can hopefully get more diversity. THey could be a good source for those wanting to breed hardy ramblers or just to get R. maxim. into polyantha or other diploid repeat blooming lines.

I have a limited number of extra ‘Ross Rambler’ seedlings. My plant is next to a number of rugosas and I suspect some may be crosses with them.

Please send me an email with your shipping information and I’ll do my best to accomodate you. The plants are in 3" pots. THanks for giving these orphans homes!!

Sincerely,

David

Hi David,

I’d be interested in your (Polyantha x R. maximowicziana) OP seedlings.

Julie

Thank you Julie!! THere are still orphans of all three backgrounds if people are interested in them.

David

David, I’ll take a Beggeriana seedling if you still have one. Thanks!

David,

Did you get my email?

Mark

Hi Mark, No, I didn’t get you email unfortunately… Hopefully that doesn’t mean that the email link isn’t working. I checked my email as I write this post that my computer automatically puts in the email box and it is right. If someone else made a request, would you write a little note saying you did on this thread? I have requests now from Betsy, Julie, and Mark.

Thank you!!

David

David,

Did you get my email?

Pierre

I’m sorry Pierre, I didn’t. I checked my spam box too and the emails weren’t there either. I don’t know what is happening. My email is my last name at rocketmail.com

David

David,

I want to thank you for one experimental rose you sent, now two years ago. It was a r. arkansana hybrid. It replaced my species r. arkansana when I discovered that yours didn’t send out the invasive runners that the species does. I am going to transplant it this fall to see if it has the tap root which makes r. arkansana so dought resistant. I will keep you updated.

i have some self-hips maturing for fall harvest and in the spring I will cross it with Gina’s Rose, a thornless 5 petalled reddish rose which reblooms unremittingly. I hope thereby to get a repeat bloomer with the drought resistant tap root.

Paul D. Love

David,

I had to put in a new sewer line this summer and had to uproot and replant my entire rose bed in the heat of the Arkansas summer. I lost a couple of the other roses you sent, both experimental. Even watering every day could not keep up with the intense heat.

I have room for any others you think would be useful in breeding strong roses.

Paul

Hi Paul!

That is great that the R. arkansana hybrid is doing well!! Wow, my heart sunk thinking about you having to move all your roses in the heat of summer now in AK!!

I’ll see what I have left that may help breed strong roses.

Sincerely,

David

David- I would be interested in a seedling if they are still available. Thanks David

Milford Clausen.

Thank you, David, for your response. You described it as a “healthy, lightly stippled R. arkansana op seedling with purple filaments.”

If openly pollinated, it is most likely self pollinated and will unlikely have any (recessive) gene for remontancy. I remain hopeful, however, that its failure to send out invasive runners, a victorious failure in a rose to be sure, results from some nobler parent than the lowly r.arkansana. If you know anything more of its parentage, I will be grateful.

PS. To move my garden in the middle of summer, I rose at 5:00 am and was in the garden before light. I had to stop by 10:30 am by which time I was working for 10 minutes and then laying by the air conditioner vent for 15 minutes before repeating the cycle. I finished the day before leaving for vacation in California’s wine country where wonderful weather permits day long gardening. Luther Burbank chose to do his pioneering work in that region for a reason–it’s marvelous for plants of all kinds.