Photos wanted

I was wondering whether anyone grew ‘White Immensee’, Rosa wichurana, and/or ‘Temple Bells’ that might be able to post some diagnostic-type photos? I have a plant here that I believe is one of these but I can’t find any adequate diagnostic-type photos.

Scratch Rosa wichurana… mine has 7 petals

Here are some diagnostic-type photos of mine (which I really think is ‘Temple Bells’:










\

If I remember well as it is winter here; these photos are not White Immensee. Nor Pink Immensee whose flowers color is close. Both have lower numbered wider petals and rounder less denticulate flatter leaflets.

I would guess Temple Bells over the others because it looks like it has both heavy wichurana AND multiflora influence. However, I would not exclude other, non-mentioned possibilities as well.

What features here show multiflora influence, Jadae?

The fringed stipules are a multiflora characteristic.

Thx Jim

However, I would not exclude other, non-mentioned possibilities as well.

Jadae, I’m interested to know which other ones could be listed. I’ve trawled HMF and not found that many other possible candidates.

Yes, fringed stipules are typical of R. multiflora, but they are not exclusive to R. multiflora.

Take a look at the link and other botanical illustrations of R. luciae and R. wichurana. I’ve observed the rather large, wide stipules with appendages on the margins of stipules on R. luciae at a local botanic garden. I don’t have my hard drive with all my pictures with me at the moment, but IIRC, the stipules of Wichurana/Luciae are often folded, which can obscure the fringing.

Flora of China describes the stipules as follows:

“stipules mostly adnate to petiole, free parts lanceolate, margin glandular serrate or dentate…”

I have only a few hybrid wichurana, but my impression is that the fringing of the stipules is lost rather quickly in hybrids.

Link: www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.131118

I recall stipules like this on my R. soulieana also.

The stipules are part of it, but the overall feel is, too. For example, the way the leaves set and the general overall architecture. I think it is both multi-factored and a holistic impression.