Opinions on these crosses

I would like some opinions about these crosses I plan to make this year.

The goal, several generations down the line, is a disease resistant, yellow, repeat bloom, crested moss shrub. I’m thinking that these could be used for my first crosses.

Chapeau de Napoleon(CdN) x Gold Medal (and the reverse)

CdN x Sequoia Gold (and the reverse)

CdN x Oregold (and the reverse)

I also have a couple of Henri Martin I would like to throw into the mix. If I get enough blooms this first year I’ll use it.

If my thinking about hybridizing is correct, these should provide a couple seedlings for future parentage. Or maybe not!

I didn’t see much about disease resistance for the CdN or HM. Does anyone have information about these?

Thanks,

Jeff

Jeff,

You need to know that ‘Chapeau de Napoleon’ won’t set viable seeds, so don’t bother trying it as a seed parent. Its definitely useful for pollen only. (What little pollen you wil get from it) I would question the usefulness of ‘Sequoia Gold’ as a parent; it typically produces a lot of whites and very pale yellows, at best. I would go to ‘Cal Poly’ instead, if you can.

Be prepared for a lot of sterility in the first generation of crosses with ‘Chapeau de Napoleon’. Do you have access to ‘Crested Jewel’? That would be an ideal plant to work with, as it is highly fertile and has one copy of the remontancy gene you will want in the mix ASAP.

Paul

Paul:

I checked for availability of Cal Poly and Crested Jewel from some on-line nurseries and they are available. Guess I need to place a couple more orders.

Thanks for the information about CdN. I want to get going on this little project without reinventing the rose wheel.

Thanks,

Jeff

I can see more raised beds being built when the rain stops!

Gold Medal sets hips, but the seeds don’t germinate very well. It is much better as a pollen parent.

This probably is obvious to those of you that have been hybridizing for some time. After reading what Paul and Jim wrote, I went back through HMF lineage and looked at the parentage section for each rose that I plan on breeding. It was interesting to see that some roses are used only for pollen, some for seed and others for both. I’ve also looked through the plants that have been produced from some crosses to examine color, bloom, foliage, disease resistance and the like. HMF is turning out to be a great resource if you take the information provided and work it through the ole brain. And like I’ve mentioned before, hybridizing roses seems to have a pretty steep learning curve. Sometimes the answers are right in front of you and other times you need to dig.

Jeff, steep learning curve or not, you seem to catch on pretty fast if you ask me.

Robert:

In my wanderings through HMF I saw a number of plants you listed with Just Joey as a parent. You have some very nice roses. Same for Paul and Jim. I feel like a minor league ball player mixing it up with the NFL.

Jeff, ‘Just Joey’ is sort of a default seed parent in my garden. It’s my Wife’s favorite rose and that counts for something. It’s not the best seed parent. It took awhile to start forming hips. Once in awhile I get lucky with it.

Disease resistance is not it’s strong point but you can’t argue with those blossoms.

The only advantage anyone here has over you Jeff is just that we’ve been doing it longer. Rose breeding takes awhile. I’ve only been at it about 10 years and that when I have the time.

Longevity is a big advantage in rose hybridizing.

Robert wrote:

“The only advantage anyone here has over you Jeff is just that we’ve been doing it longer. Rose breeding takes awhile. I’ve only been at it about 10 years and that when I have the time. Longevity is a big advantage in rose hybridizing.”

Amen to that, Robert! :0) The only reason I have an occassional piece of advice to offer, is because I’ve been at it [but only in my spare time] since 1988. But feeling like there’s so much to learn, isn’t such a bad place to be, Jeff. Just remember all the company you’ve got, and don’t forget to keep us up to date on what you’ve learned. I’ll betcha you’ve already got things you could teach us.

Take care, Tom