IS THIS TEMPERATURE TO HOT FOR HYBRIDIZING ?

I LIVE IN N. LOUISIANA AND I’M HYBRIDIZING IN A GREENHOUSE THAT IS NOT VENTED VERY WELL. IT’S GETTING UP TO 105F… IS THIS TO HOT FOR BREEDING ROSES?

Most crosses here in the Palm Springs area are pretty much fruitless after 100 degrees. I’ve discovered a handful of seed parents that will still set hips under those conditions.

Thanks Robert they r out of the greenhouse as of now…

Robert is correct. In fact, many cultivars will not set seed well in temps over 90F.

Good luck,

Paul

See:

http://www.springerlink.com/(xs2rmmqjt0k2bz45xh35lp45)/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,14,42;journal,297,401;linkingpublicationresults,1:102881,1

Link: http://www.springerlink.com/(xs2rmmqjt0k2bz45xh35lp45)/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,14,42;journal,297,401;linkingpublicationresults,1:102881,1

My experience here in the desert is similar. After about May 5 almost nothing takes. Temps are in the 90’s by that time and I get very little seed set or OP’s for that matter either.

My link above had the double http. Please use the cut and paste link in the body of the message.

Henry,

Why post a link to an article that a person has to create an account in order to read?

I have the same experience and it gets hot fast here in South Texas. But Darlow’s Enigma really does better the hotter it is so I wait and do all the others in early Spring and do Darlow in the middle of Summer. Once you know your roses better you can plan better to get the ones that quit being fertile early first and then the others.

Patrick

Paul, are you saying that you do not see the abstract at the link that I gave?

I posted the link to the abstract with the intention that anyone who was interested in the actual full paper would go to their local university library and either read it there or, if the library did not have it, have the library request it by interlibrary loan.

Another way (that used to work) is to write the authors and ask for a reprint.

Henry,

All I get when I follow the link is a page requesting that I create an account and sign in to view the article.

Paul, I tried accessing it through my wife’s computer as a test as to whether my computer has a special “cookie”.

It was readable through my wife’s computer. Has anyone else had a problem with the cut and paste form (not the first direct link which had a double http)?

I have put it below as a direct link in case your cut and paste would not handle such a long address.

Link: www.springerlink.com/(xs2rmmqjt0k2bz45xh35lp45)/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,14,42;journal,297,401;linkingpublicationresults,1:102881,1

According to the abstract of the article, the best temperature for pollinating successfully (among those tested, anyway, with the two cultivars tested) is 22 degrees C (about 72 degrees F).

Peter

Henry, for future reference: www.tinyurl.com

Does anyone have any information suggesting more difficult crosses might be possible under warmer conditions, assuming pollination is successful?

out here also the link from Henry also fails to go to the journal of interest. I’ll try on a university computer tomorrow that may let me access the article.

Another way to access the abstract is to put the title into Google Scholar ( http://scholar.google.com/ ) .

The title is:

The effect of temperature on fruit set, seed set and seed germination in Sonia

Thank You for the Google link. I had the same problem of not being able to view the article at first. I live in Tampa Bay, and oddly for the most part I seem to be able to make crosses for the most part of the year, except for a few roses. My problem mainly is knowing if I have let the hips go overly ripe, many of the hips do not turn red. I seem to have the best luck by just letting the stems turn brownish and harvesting. Going by date for me doesnt really seem to help. Any thoughts? My temps stay 93 F almost daily in the Summer if anyone thinks it would help I have the book of the crosses I made last year and can list what took.

Andrew