Holland and Home

Here are a few pics of the trail plots at home here in Australia. The pic with the rows is in Holland, the two middle rows contain roses which were budded with budwood sent over in June. Buds were reharvested from these and budded onto more rootstock in August.
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Congratulations, Warren! They look great!

I am over the moon with the ones in the damp conditions in Holland, no problems there.

WOW! Warren, beautiful.
Winter is about to descend on us here on the Canadian Prairies. After seeing your roses I feel like going out right now and working with my roses.
What is the soil type you plant your roses in? it looks sandy.

chuckp

Chuck the soil we have here is Cobram loam, clayey loam. When moist it is very easy digging, but when dry sets like cement or concrete. Roses really like and grow like all billy-oh. I do not envy you with those Canadian Prairie temps during winter.

Thanks Warren, I do feel bless to live here,mother nature does my pruning for me. But this blessing does come with some serious challenges. It sounds like you have the same basic soil type as we do in the Red River Valley.

This leads me to my next question, on a practical basis. How do you manage weed control and irrigation?
Do you irrigate with well water and how do you deliver it to the plants, viz. Overhead sprinklers, flooding, or drip irrigation?

Chuck I flood irrigate betwwen the rows which I find very efficient, over head watering is not due to the winds here and low humidty. The worst weed infestation is in the winter when most of the soil surface is exposed to direct sunlight due to them being pruned. Once the growing season starts the foliage canopies join, blocking out sunlight to the soil surface. I don’t mulch because the wind blows it away. What weeds that do come up I chip out.