Bloom off rose for Morden breeding program

"MORDEN – Roses are red, violets are blue, Morden once bred the hardiest, most beautiful roses in Canada,

Now that’s no longer true.

The Prairie Joy, the Morden Sunrise, the Morden Snow Beauty, the Cuthbert Grant and the Hope for Humanity.

Or how about this name for a rose: the Morden Fireglow.

They were all developed in the world-famous rose-breeding program at the federal experimental farm in Morden.

It’s wrapping up now. This is the last year for the program that has bred hardier, more colourful, more frequent blooming roses for nearly 80 years."

The quote above is from the link below.

Link: www.winnipegfreepress.com/life/bloom-off-rose-for-morden-breeding-program-100178814.html

Prairie Joy is new for me this year. It accepts pollen from everything including diploids, plus it sets op hips copiously. This government has deleted spending for anything meaningful. They prefer war toys.

And it is not just Canada! What a loss.

man, I could of sworn that program was shut down long ago by Ag-Canada…

Liz, you are probably thinking of the Explorer program which was shut down in the late 1990s.

Non government breeders are trying to take up the slack.

Link: www.canadianartistsroses.com/en/media.html

Posted by Henry Kuska [email] on Sat, Aug 7, 2010

"MORDEN – Roses are red, violets are blue, Morden once bred the hardiest, most beautiful roses in Canada,

Now that’s no longer true.

The Prairie Joy, the Morden Sunrise, the Morden Snow Beauty, the Cuthbert Grant and the Hope for Humanity.

Or how about this name for a rose: the Morden Fireglow.

They were all developed in the world-famous rose-breeding program at the federal experimental farm in Morden.

It’s wrapping up now. This is the last year for the program that has bred hardier, more colourful, more frequent blooming roses for nearly 80 years."

The quote above is from the link below

Posted by Henry Kuska [email] on Sat, Aug 7, 2010

"MORDEN – Roses are red, violets are blue, Morden once bred the hardiest, most beautiful roses in Canada,

Now that’s no longer true.

The Prairie Joy, the Morden Sunrise, the Morden Snow Beauty, the Cuthbert Grant and the Hope for Humanity.

Or how about this name for a rose: the Morden Fireglow.

They were all developed in the world-famous rose-breeding program at the federal experimental farm in Morden.

It’s wrapping up now. This is the last year for the program that has bred hardier, more colourful, more frequent blooming roses for nearly 80 years."

The quote above is from the link below

Link: www.winnipegfreepress.com/life/bloom-off-rose-for-morden-breeding-program-100178814.html

The “wild roses he (Henry Marshall) dug out of ditches” was, of course, Rosa arkansana.

“Marshall, … oversaw the introduction of over 40 new roses, including the Parkland series.” In fact, of the 16 Parkland cultivars introduced by Morden Agriculture Canada, Henry Marshall received credit for developing eight of them. Of course, some of his cultivars and breeding lines he developed are in the pedigrees of some of the other Parkland cultivars Lynn Collicutt and Dr. Campbell Davidson developed.

The 17th Parkland rose is my double white sport of ‘Morden Blush’ named and registered as ‘Prairie Snowdrift’ in 2008. It is superior in flower quality and disease resistance to ‘Morden Snowbeauty’. Plants of this cultivar should be available in Canadian garden centres next year.

John Wiens, former Morden mayor is quoted as saying, “Lets face it, original (rose) research is expensive and it may not pay off.” Well, that depends. If it is done by an institution like an agricultural research station or university it goes without saying that research is expensive. But rose breeding, because of the substantial increased knowledge and skills amateur breeders have developed within the last 20 years or so, means we are no longer dependent on institutions for original rose breeding research. We are just as capable of producing new types of roses of high quality having commerical potential. And because the breeding work is done in the “back yard,” expenses can be minimal.

Lace Cascade is a pretty good example of Rosa arkansana in modern roses. Its possibly one of the best white climbers to date but its gone largely unnoticed. Its interesting because the F2 product of this species is much more modern in appearance that the two modern hybrids involved in its creation.